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iDEA: Drexel E-repository and Archives > Drexel Academic Community > College of Engineering > Department of Civil, Architectural,and Environmental Engineering > Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on HydroScience and Engineering (ICHE 2006) [ISBN: 0977447405] > Changes in impervious surface area, flood frequency, and water chemistry within the Delaware River basin during the past 50 years: initial results

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1379

Title: Changes in impervious surface area, flood frequency, and water chemistry within the Delaware River basin during the past 50 years: initial results
Authors: Sun, Hongbing
Hewins, Daniel B.
Latini, Daniel
Husch, Jonathan M.
Keywords: Decision support;Flood prevention;Impact assessment;Water resources management
Issue Date: 11-Sep-2006
Publisher: Michael Piasecki and College of Engineering, Drexel University
Citation: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Hydroscience and Engineering, Philadelphia, PA, September 2006. http://hdl.handle.net/1860/732
Abstract: Housing development and total road mileage expansion, which result from the growing population and economic activity in the region, increased the total impervious surface area (ISA) within the Delaware River Basin (DRB) from either 3.19% or 3.69% of the total basin area in 1950 to either 5.41% or 6.44% of the total basin area in 2000, depending on which of two plausible scenarios are used for interpreting the available housing and road mileage data. Assuming an average area of 0.3 acre and 35% ISA for a single-unit detached house and 0.1 acre and 60% ISA for all other housing units, the projected ISA for the DRB is 5.66% in 2006. This result is comparable with the existing GIS data from the LandSat Thematic Mapper Imager for part of the DRB. Associated with the increasing ISA in the DRB, there also is an increase in flood events for recent years. Increased peak flows in July and August, which are the two months with the highest precipitation, also are noticeable. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the Delaware River water increased between 2-4.6 times over the last 50 years at both upstream and downstream locations. Increased application of sodium chloride, in the form of deicing salt that is tied to the expansion of total road mileage in the basin, may be one of the main reasons for the increase of these ions in the waters of the Delaware River.
Description: Paper presented at The Seventh International Conference on HydroScience and Engineering (ICHE)hosted by the College of Engineering at Drexel Univeristy on September 10-13, 2006 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The conference theme was IT in the Field of HydroSciences. It included several mini-symposia that emphasized IT topics in HydroSciences and the yearly meeting of the metadata group of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange organization.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1379
ISBN: 0977447405
Appears in Collections:Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on HydroScience and Engineering (ICHE 2006) [ISBN: 0977447405]

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