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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1793

Title: The impact of brief acceptance-based versus control-based interventions on distress tolerance in early lapsing nicotine dependent individuals
Authors: Murray, Heather W.
Keywords: Clinical Psychology;Nicotine addiction;Substance abuse--Psychological aspects
Issue Date: 5-Sep-2007
Abstract: The prevalence of nicotine dependence continues to be a major public health concern. Despite advances in treatments, many smokers continue to be dependent on nicotine, and often relapse within hours or days of cessation attempts. Preliminary investigations indicate that the level of tolerance for the distress of nicotine withdrawal is a key factor in early smoking lapse and subsequent relapse. In this pilot study, the effect of brief interventions on early lapsing nicotine dependent individuals’ ability to tolerate psychological and physiological distress as imposed by laboratory challenges was examined. Participants were early lapsing nicotine dependent individuals, a population of smokers that has elevated risk of maintaining smoking habits. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three 30-minute interventions: 1) an acceptance-based brief intervention that promoted experiential acceptance, 2) a control-based brief intervention that encouraged attempts to alter or change thoughts, or 3) a health consequences comparison condition thought to increase awareness of health problems related to smoking. Participants’ distress tolerance significantly increased during the psychological and physiological stressors, but distress tolerance did not differ across groups. In addition, differences between the groups in latency to smoking immediately following the termination of the stressors were not observed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1793
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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