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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/310

Title: Impact of timing of alcohol use initiation and depressed mood on risky substance use among urban minority adolescents
Authors: Boohar, Ellen Moore
Keywords: Psychology;Minority teenagers -- Alcohol use;Depression in adolescence
Issue Date: 10-Jun-2004
Abstract: The current study involved the investigation of two research areas: (1) the effect of timing of alcohol use initiation on risky substance use in mid-adolescence, and (2) the concurrent and longitudinal relationship between level of depressed mood and adolescent substance use behaviors. The original sample (n=1213) was comprised of predominantly Black and Hispanic adolescents of low socioeconomic status, enrolled in three Brooklyn, NY middle schools. As part of the Reach for Health risk-prevention program, these youth completed the Student Health Survey at multiple time points between 1994 and 2000. The current study utilized data collected at the 7th, 8th, and 10th grade surveys. Logistic regression analyses showed that timing of alcohol use initiation was a significant predictor of several substance use outcomes, including getting drunk or high, using marijuana or cocaine, substance-related psychosocial impairment, and having future intentions to drink. Youth who started drinking by the 7th grade were more likely than those who started drinking at later time points to engage in risky substance use behaviors at the 10th grade. Neither gender nor race/ethnicity were related to substance use outcomes; however, chi square analyses revealed different patterns of substance use for boys vs. girls and Blacks vs. Hispanics. Furthermore, level of depressed mood was related cross-sectionally to most substance use behaviors at the 8th and 10th grades, with trends showing higher rates of alcohol and drug use among youth with higher levels of depressed mood. Racial/ethnic comparisons showed that level of depressed mood was related cross-sectionally to substance use among Black adolescents, but not Hispanic youth. Also, logistic regression analyses found that a high level of depressed mood in the 8th grade was a significant predictor of getting intoxicated and substance-related psychosocial impairment in the 10th grade. These findings provide important implications for parents, schools, health providers, communities, and the media. It is suggested that preventing alcohol use and providing interventions for depressed mood among urban, minority youth in early adolescence may reduce these youths’ risk of developing problems with drugs and alcohol in later adolescence.
URI: http://dspace.library.drexel.edu/handle/1860/310
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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