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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/36

Title: Macroporous hydrogels as vascularizable soft tissue – implant interfaces: materials characterization, in vitro evaluation, computer simulations, and applications in implantable drug delivery devices
Authors: Dziubla, Thomas D.
Keywords: Porosity;Colloids in medicine;Drug delivery devices;Chemical engineering
Issue Date: 14-Mar-2003
Publisher: Drexel University
Abstract: Implantable medical devices, such as biosensors and implantable drug delivery systems, function optimally when rapid solute exchange can occur between implant and surrounding tissue. However, almost all materials implanted into the body are encapsulated in a fibrous layer that prevents this rapid communication. Macroporous materials are known to change this response by allowing vascularized tissue ingrowth, however many questions still exist as to the role material properties play. In this work, macroporous hydrogels are presented as an ideal interface between implant and tissue due to there mechanical properties which are similar to soft tissue. These materials were synthesized with varying degrees of porosity, pore size, and surface hydrophilicity. It was found from that when the hydrogel’s pore sizes were 10 µm or larger, they became highly vascularized in vitro, regardless of surface hydrophilicity. This response was different from previous literature where larger pores sizes (~60 µm) were necessary. It was thought that the lack of a secondary infiltrating cell (macrophages) during the in vitro studies was the cause for this discrepancy. Computer simulations verified the in vitro results presented. From in vivo studies, this high degree of vascularity was found to not only lengthen the life span of an implanted drug delivery device, but also improve the associated uptake response.
URI: http://dspace.library.drexel.edu/handle/1860/36
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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