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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/496

Title: The ability of social problem-solving to mediate the relationship between breast cancer severity and posttraumatic stress symptomatology
Authors: Stoll, Jeffrey G.
Keywords: Clincal psychology;Breast--Cancer;Post-traumatic stress disorder--Psychological aspects
Issue Date: 22-Jun-2005
Abstract: The current study evaluated the importance social problem solving (SPS) in determining posttraumatic stress symptom severity among breast cancer survivors. The foundation for this study is consistent with the problem-solving model of stress and coping. It is proposed that SPS likely functions in two separate manners in the presentation of PTSD. First, it is a part of the appraisal process in PTSD presentation, and second, it has a role in determining how effectively traumatized individuals utilize there social resources. It was hypothesized that SPS would mediate the relationship between cancer severity and PTSD symptomatology. Forty-three women who were 1-year post cancer diagnosis completed self-report questionnaires. Results found that global scores of SPS do not mediate the relationship between cancer severity and PTSD symptomatology; however, negative problem orientation predicted caner-related PTSD symptomatology and was found to mediate the relationship between cancer severity and PTSD symptomatology. These results suggest that negative problem orientation (a mechanism of appraisal) likely has a significant role in determining caner-related PTSD symptomatology. Rational problem-solving skills did not predict cancer-related PTSD symptomatology. These results support the concept that appraisal is a significant aspect of PTSD, but that the performance skills of SPS may not have a direct role in the presentation of PTSD-symptomatology. The clinical and research implications of this study are discussed in the context of the limitations of this cross-sectional study.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/496
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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