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iDEA: Drexel E-repository and Archives > Drexel Academic Community > School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems > Biomedical Technology Showcase, 2006 > Real time monitoring of the effect of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) and surface charges on the cell adhesion process using multi-resonance thickness shear mode (MTSM) sensor

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/951

Title: Real time monitoring of the effect of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) and surface charges on the cell adhesion process using multi-resonance thickness shear mode (MTSM) sensor
Authors: Ergezen, Ertan
Hong, S.
Barbee, Kenneth A.
Lec, Ryszard M.
Keywords: Biosensors;Biomarkers;Bioimaging;Bioinformatics
Issue Date: 2006
Citation: Poster presented at Biomedical Technology Showcase 2006, Philadelphia, PA. Retrieved 18 Aug 2006 from http://www.biomed.drexel.edu/new04/Content/Biomed_Tech_Showcase/Poster_Presentations/Barbee_4.pdf.
Abstract: A thickness shear mode (MTSM) sensor was used to study the effects of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) and surface charge on the cellular interactions of the cell membrane with different substrates to determine the kinetics of cell adhesion. The MTSM sensor was operated at 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th harmonics. Since the penetration depth of the shear wave decreases with an increase in frequency, the multi-resonance operation of the MTSM sensor was used to monitor the changes in the kinetics of the cell-substrate interaction at different distances from the sensor surface. During the sedimentation and the initial attachment of the cells on the sensor surface, the changes in the sensor resonant frequency and the magnitude response were monitored. First, HSPGs were digested with the enzyme Heparinase III to evaluate the effect of HSPG on the cell adhesion process. The results indicated that HSPG did not have any effect on the kinetics of the initial attachment, although it did reduce the strength of steady-state cell adhesion. Next we investigated the effect of the electrostatic interactions of the cell membrane with the substrate on the cell adhesion. In this case, the sensor surface was coated with positively charged Poly-D-Lysine (PDL). It was observed that electrostatic interaction of the negatively charged cell membrane with the PDL surface promoted the initial cell adhesion but did not support long-term cell adhesion. The multi-resonant TSM technique was shown to be a very promising method for monitoring specific interfacial effects involving in cell adhesion process in real-time.
Description: Item from the Biomedical Technology Showcase held July 20, 2006 at Drexel University's Bossone Research Enterprise Center.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/951
Appears in Collections:Biomedical Technology Showcase, 2006

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